• Rewind & Rewatch

    Rewind & Rewatch: The Prisoner – A. B. and C.

    I will start the third episode rewatch with my prologue from the first episode–as a caveat and introduction. I’ll put this intro into an indented section to make it easier for people who’ve read it to skip it and get to the current episode. I am starting a Rewind & Rewatch series on The Prisoner (the 1967 British series, created by Patrick McGoohan and George Markstein and starring McGoohan). I’ll be following the DVD episode order throughout this rewatch. In this series, I am merely looking for things of interest to me, ideas I find striking. This series is decidedly not a comprehensive review of The Prisoner, and these are certainly not my final thoughts on the TV…

  • Podcast

    The Salty Pod – Episodes 1 & 2

    Here are the first two episodes of The Salty Pod. In part one, we talk about our impressions of Star Trek: Picard‘s first few episodes. In the second part, we discuss our thoughts about the series as a whole. Support the Pod: https://anchor.fm/saltypod/support You can subscribe to the podcast on your favorite podcasting app: Itunes Spotify RadioPublic Pocket Casts Overcast Google Podcasts Breaker

  • Rewind & Rewatch

    Rewind & Rewatch: The Prisoner – The Chimes of Big Ben

    I will start the second episode rewatch with my prologue from the first episode (and will most likely continue this practice throughout the series)–as a caveat and introduction. I’ll put this intro into an indented section to make it easier for people who’ve read it to skip it and get to the current episode. I am starting a Rewind & Rewatch series on The Prisoner (the 1967 British series, created by Patrick McGoohan and George Markstein and starring McGoohan). I’ll be following the DVD episode order throughout this rewatch. In this series, I am merely looking for things of interest to me, ideas I find striking. This series is decidedly not a comprehensive review of…

  • Rewind & Rewatch

    Rewind & Rewatch: The Prisoner – Arrival

    I am starting a Rewind & Rewatch series on The Prisoner (the 1967 British series, created by Patrick McGoohan and George Markstein and starring McGoohan). I’ll be following the DVD episode order throughout this rewatch. In this series, I am merely looking for things of interest to me, ideas I find striking. This series is decidedly not a comprehensive review of The Prisoner, and these are certainly not my final thoughts on the TV series. It’s more like a set of notes. With any good piece of art, one can continually come back to it and find fecundity: missed elements, new relevancies, new avenues for thought. And, of course, there is already quite a bit…

  • Culture,  Media,  Politics

    JFK & TV: ‘A Force That Has Changed The Political Scene’

    In an article for the Smithsonian, Kat Eschner writes about President Kennedy’s views on the medium of TV for politics: “…when Kennedy was a senator for Massachusetts planning a presidential run, TV Guide published an article he wrote titled ‘A Force That Has Changed The Political Scene.’ In that article, Kennedy wrote that television’s ‘revolutionary impact’ would have far-reaching and lasting consequences for politics. As his own iconic presidency proved, he wasn’t wrong. For the most part, Kennedy ‘side[d] with those who feel its net effect can definitely be for the better,’ writes Alexis C. Madrigal for The Atlantic. But he also worried in a prescient manner about its potential negative effects. He wrote: ‘But…

  • Book Reviews

    Review – The Physicist and the Philosopher

    Jimena Canales tells the neglected story of Einstein and Bergson, the physicist and the philosopher. It is a story of a debate–a debate about time–that took place on April 6th, 1922. The mere mention of Einstein in a debate with anyone is enough to draw one in to hear more. But it helps, of course, that Canales recounts the arguments so well. We might think that Einstien was the famous one in this debate, but, historically, we would be mistaken. Einstien became well known after the famous eclipse expedition in 1919 that confirmed his theory, and, so, he was just beginning to see his stature rise at this time. But…

  • Book Reviews

    Review – At the Existentialist Cafe

    At the Existential Cafe is about (as the title readily suggests) the movers and shakers in the modern line of existentialism. As Bakewell notes, this line can be traced in different ways: “…to anguished novelists of the nineteenth century, and beyond that to Blaise Pascal…and beyond that to the soul-searching of St. Augustine, and beyond that to the Old Testament’s weary Ecclesiastes and to Job…But one can go the other way around, and narrow the birth of modern existentialism down to a moment near the turn of 1932-3, when three young philosophers were sitting in the Bec-de-Gaz bar on the rue du Montparnasse in Paris, catching up on gossip and drinking…

  • TV/Film Reviews

    Review – The Orville

    I want to like The Orville. There are positives. For example, I think Seth MacFarlane as Captain Ed Mercer is likable as our Every-person, our guide to this world. The relationship with his first officer, Commander Kelly Grayson (played by Adrianne Lee Palicki) is an interesting one, even if the evenness of MacFarlane’s reactions to her could be better (or more enlightened): his character alternates between making digs at her expense and saying he is over her affair. Making the main female character the ‘unfaithful’ cause of the end of their marriage might also be considered a bit tired and clichéd: one could hope for a fresh take, a more progressive…